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Saturday, 2 March 2013

in which a complete stranger invades my privacy!!

Dear Reader, yes, I made the mistake of leaving my laptop in the presence of a complete stranger, who I have discovered to my horror accessed my laptop and saw my private data! What horrifies me most is that he saw some of my private writings meant only for my eyes only.

I didn't realise that the act of leaving my laptop lying around would invite the **&&&### to actually read my private files, one which was saved in a confidential file! I feel violated right now, I feel exposed. In this techno -savvy  age, our computers have become an extension of our personalities, they are the equivalents of personal diaries, one which holds our deepest and most embarrassing secrets - our music, photos, ebooks etc.

You cannot imagine my chagrin at discovering this person's actually having used my laptop, I feel exposed to this intrusive gaze. The fact that he is a man, a person I don't really like, and also that he used the 15 mins of my absence to actually use my laptop without my permission has made me feel really vulnerable.

However, it has taught me a valuable lesson; and I'll NEVER leave my laptop lying about (this happened in my home; but still...). I also wonder at the voyeuristic tendency of certain individuals, what gives them the right to actually violate other peoples'privacy so? I send this question into the 'void'...What are your thoughts dear void?

6 comments:

  1. Wow, what an a-hole. You're a guess in someone's home (I assume) and you just open someone's laptop and use it? That's like going into someone's bedroom and opening drawers.

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    1. Well...that's exactly what he did! My laptop was on my desk in my bedroom.

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  2. Somewhat obviously, if your guest were a commercial invitee such as a repair person, you might have recourse to complain to that person's employer about thoroughly inappropriate, unprofessional, un-work-related, invasive misbehavior.
    * If the stranger was from the police, Federal Bureau of Investigation, I.R.S., etc., and you gave them permission for a search without a warrant, then the stranger's behavior might be understandable.
    * If there were some social connection -- friend of a friend, friend of your spouse/s.o./children, etc. -- then your connection might want to know about the stranger's behavior.
    * If you routinely allow all sorts of other types of strangers in your home, perhaps a high-adrenaline hobby would be actually more safe.
    * If passwords are too boring or too much trouble, you might distract future laptop invaders for a few minutes by having some easy-to-find files with titles such as, "locations of my murder victims", "local cocaine dealer phonebook", or "new frontiers in intimate photography".

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  3. Pat, this guy works in my office, is actually an assistant. He dropped by on some work with other people and whilst I was making tea and something to eat for the group actually went into my bedroom and through my laptop.

    I think that your idea for the easy to find files is brilliant! I think that definitely ought to give such ##$$@@ their thrills! :P

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  4. In lieu of the fact that he works with you, you definitely should report him at least to HR, or if accessible, to an officer of the company. When I was CEO of a corporation, if I found out something like this happened, and had not been reported to me, I'd be angry both at the intruder and the victim. If he threatens to use knowledge he stole top hurt you---socially, in your job, publicly---get a good attorney and prosecute him for blackmail. There is not the first reason you should not report him. I suffer outrage with you.

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    1. Thanks for the suggestion. :) and it done and sorted. :)

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